Jim Bennett
Xamarin MVP Microsoft MVP

Mobile developer at EROAD, Xamarin MVP and Certified Developer, Microsoft MVP, author of Xamarin In Action, blogger, speaker, father and lover of beer, whisky and Thai food. Opinions are my own.

  Auckland, New Zealand
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So after yesterdays attempt to create a 'Hello World' app using the new Cordova tools for Visual Studio, I thought tonight I'd try again.

If you haven't heard the news, Microsoft announced a CTP of support for Cordova inside Visual Studio. Thats right, Microsoft is opening up to a world of other devices. The aim is to allow you to build HTML5 apps inside Visual Studio and deploy to Windows Phone, Android and iOS, all from one place (with a networked Mac for iOS building).
I guess this might put Adobe's PhoneGap out of business, but hey, thats how it works when you build a business exposing open source software.

I'm writing this as I go along trying to do a 'Hello World' app, and so far not much success.

I'm working through the documentation and here are my experiences:

First I did the basics - I launched Visual Studio and created a new solution using the new Multi Device Hybrid App template. I set up my MacBook Pro to host the remote build and simulation agent, set the build output to be the iOS simulator and hit build. First problem - it couldn't find Java. It seems the installer didn't successfully install the Java 7 JDK. One more delay whilst I download and install this.

Once the JDK was installed - I tried building and running again. Next thing I know, up pops Chrome (with the obligatory set your default browser prompt - I use IE as my default simply so I can use a bowser on my surface in Metro mode, oh for Firefox for Metro) running the iOS simulator with my 'Hello World' app running. WooHoo!

Now to try the first interesting bit - can I run the app on an iOS simulator on my Mac? Lets set the output on Visual Studio and see what happens!
So far so good - things are happening on the Mac's terminal.
And as if by magic:

I'm in shock. No third party paid for components like Xamarin, just an installer from Microsoft that installs open source code and I have an iOS simulator on my Mac running code from Visual Studio. This is groundbreaking stuff (to a techy of course - it didn't cause my wife to even look up from whatever celebrity gossip site she's browsing).

Lets take it all the way - lets see if it can run on my iPhone itself.

Seems you can't have it all - Code signing error. I guess I need to provision my iPhone. BRB!

Time to let a picture paint a thousand words:

Excuse the poor quality shot - it's late and I couldn't be bothered to turn the lights up. Thats the same app - the basic Visual Studio Multi Device Hybrid app template built on my Surface using my MacBookPro as a remote build agent, installed using iTunes on the Surface running on my iPhone.

iPhone development has just got a lot easier.
Tomorrow I'll try adding some code and developing a simple app.




About the Author

Jim Bennett

International C# and Xamarin geek - Microsoft MVP, Xamarin MVP and Certified Developer, blogger, speaker, father and lover of beer, whisky and Thai food

 

So after yesterdays attempt to create a 'Hello World' app using the new Cordova tools for Visual Studio, I thought tonight I'd try again.

If you haven't heard the news, Microsoft announced a CTP of support for Cordova inside Visual Studio. Thats right, Microsoft is opening up to a world of other devices. The aim is to allow you to build HTML5 apps inside Visual Studio and deploy to Windows Phone, Android and iOS, all from one place (with a networked Mac for iOS building).
I guess this might put Adobe's PhoneGap out of business, but hey, thats how it works when you build a business exposing open source software.

I'm writing this as I go along trying to do a 'Hello World' app, and so far not much success.

I'm working through the documentation and here are my experiences:

First I did the basics - I launched Visual Studio and created a new solution using the new Multi Device Hybrid App template. I set up my MacBook Pro to host the remote build and simulation agent, set the build output to be the iOS simulator and hit build. First problem - it couldn't find Java. It seems the installer didn't successfully install the Java 7 JDK. One more delay whilst I download and install this.

Once the JDK was installed - I tried building and running again. Next thing I know, up pops Chrome (with the obligatory set your default browser prompt - I use IE as my default simply so I can use a bowser on my surface in Metro mode, oh for Firefox for Metro) running the iOS simulator with my 'Hello World' app running. WooHoo!

Now to try the first interesting bit - can I run the app on an iOS simulator on my Mac? Lets set the output on Visual Studio and see what happens!
So far so good - things are happening on the Mac's terminal.
And as if by magic:

I'm in shock. No third party paid for components like Xamarin, just an installer from Microsoft that installs open source code and I have an iOS simulator on my Mac running code from Visual Studio. This is groundbreaking stuff (to a techy of course - it didn't cause my wife to even look up from whatever celebrity gossip site she's browsing).

Lets take it all the way - lets see if it can run on my iPhone itself.

Seems you can't have it all - Code signing error. I guess I need to provision my iPhone. BRB!

Time to let a picture paint a thousand words:

Excuse the poor quality shot - it's late and I couldn't be bothered to turn the lights up. Thats the same app - the basic Visual Studio Multi Device Hybrid app template built on my Surface using my MacBookPro as a remote build agent, installed using iTunes on the Surface running on my iPhone.

iPhone development has just got a lot easier.
Tomorrow I'll try adding some code and developing a simple app.